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Facebook: ‘the modern cause of divorce’

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Social networking site Facebook, which has more than 390m users worldwide, is the main reason for divorce in almost 20% of modern cases, lawyers have revealed.

With social networking escalating at an unprecedented rate, Facebook users have the ability to contact old friends and lovers, as well as potentially new ones, meaning old flames can be easily reignited and technology-aided adultery has become common in society.

“I heard from my staff there were a lot of people saying they had found out things about their partners on Facebook and I decided to see how prevalent it was,” claimed one divorce lawyer.

“I was really surprised to see 20 per cent of all the petitions containing references to Facebook. The most common reason seemed to be people having inappropriate sexual chats with people they were not supposed to.”

Roughly 14m Britons use social networking sites regularly and high-profile cases of ‘Facebook cheats’ are flooding the country’s press and courtrooms.

Emma Brady’s six year marriage ended last year after her husband announced his surprising bachelor status through the site’s messaging boards. Mrs Brady visited Facebook after a friend told her about the situation only to find: “Neil Brady has ended his marriage to Emma Brady” emblazoned across the screen.

But marital misdemeanours are not only being confined to such mainstream sites as Facebook. 28-year-old Newquay resident, Amy Taylor, split from her husband after discovering he had been having a ‘virtual affair’ with another woman on Second Life, an online game in which users are encouraged to reinvent themselves.

Despite declining divorce rates over the past twelve months, the recession’s pull on family tensions and technology’s willingness to assist those looking elsewhere, has led many to believe that 2010 will once again see the divorce rate soar.

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Written by Andrew Hodges

January 4, 2009 at 4:56 pm

Posted in Comment, LinkedIn

Tagged with , , ,

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